Herstory - by Maria Adele Del Vecchio
       
     
Herstory - by Maria Adele Del Vecchio
       
     
Herstory - by Maria Adele Del Vecchio

How many women have had the chance to write history? Practically none, probably all. How not to imagine a feminine thought that acts in the rooms of power of every era and cultural tradition? The first to note this is the American feminist movement that discovers that history is “his-story”, to the point that it coined the neologism “herstory”, the claim of the feminine mark on history. According to the feminine interpretation, the traditional history is an emanation of the masculine thought, the perception of the world in phallic key. Nonetheless, the effort of finding feminine figures who act within history fall against the scarcity of written sources by female hand. It is noteworthy to attempt to trace the ancient feminine thought in mythology, in popular culture, in theatre, in religion and wherever it is possible to imagine its presence, yet the research is vane and feeble. Apart form the antithesis feminine-masculine, a more interesting debate is presented, the debate on women. The neon Herstory de-contextualizes any historic semantic, the lexicon transforms in pure sculpture. The pale celestial light puts us on guard from the useless trap that makes the feminine the antithesis of masculine: contemporary neuroscience explains that the contrast between the feminine brain and the masculine one is different, yet this different does not measure the scope of the cognitive performance, rather the emotional one. The neon of Herstory does not evoke just the feminine history but is a monument dedicated to the unknown history, that of invisible human beings who had no access to the traditional instruments of power thanks to which history tells and replicates itself. 

Keyword: the holy feminine

Goddesses associated to dynastic power, sacred weddings, social stability and cosmic universe exist in Mesopotamia, Elam, Iran , Anatolia, Central Asia and ancient China. Inanna/Ishtar, Nanaia, Anahita, Xi Wang Mu, Kubaba are astral divinities, forces of nature, mediators between human and superhuman. Cosmogonic and theogonic myths are the religious apparatus that structures their millenary cults. That of the “great goddess” is in reality a myth that plays a crucial role in the passage from polytheism to monotheism: the Elamite cultural heritage weighs significantly on the Avestic and Mazdean horizon, the sacred royalty of Babylon forges the Judaic religious vision, the Anatolian world traditions leave their mark in the genesis and the identity of ancient Greece, the cultures of central Asian steppes act within the structuring of the Chinese thought. In order to invent the figure of the sole god, the I millennium BCE specialists of the sacred borrow from the very ancient figure of Inanna/Ishtar (virgin, mother and spouse of her own son, a goddess known from the III millennium BCE) to confer authority to a minor divine figure, until then a member of the polytheistic pantheon, giving birth to the figure of the Christian virgin. 

Bibliography

Raffaella Frascarelli, Holy Feminine in MesopotamiaAnatolia, Iran, Central AsiaFrom the III Millennium BCE to the VI Century CE, forthcoming 

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