Capitol Complex - by Tris Vonna Michell
       
     
Capitol Complex - by Tris Vonna Michell
       
     
Capitol Complex - by Tris Vonna Michell

The charm of post-colonial India and the space of Le Corbusier travel Paris-Chandigarh, called by Nehru in 1951 to build the capital-monument of the Indian independence, never fully com- pleted. The Indian thought does not delay in seducing the visionary modernist giant who con- ceives a city made in the image of the human body: at the head the buildings of power, the internal organs are the productive structures, the arms and legs are residential spaces. The 80 slides of Capitol Complex are homage to what remains of modernity, a testimony of the frailty imposed by time, the capturing of a mark of an unfulfilled dream. Faithful to a style that makes him unique, the artist, postmodern story teller, sides the images with his voice, brief and coded intimate narrations that influence sight before hearing. Storytelling-in-flux is the best defini- tion that one can attribute to the narrating voice of Tris Vonna Michell. 

This technique has been the engine of transmission of human history for millennia, both in the sacred as for the profane: the narrating voice that follows an invisible metric and attracts the attention transforming into memory. 

Keywords: oral Celtic tradition

The oral narration style of Tris Vonna Michell is part of a tradition in the United Kingdom that has its roots in the oral Celtic tradition. The heritage of songs, legends and sagas that are rela- ted to the English and Irish folklore is passed on by tale tellers who use streets and public squares as their arenas to give voice not just to stories of love and knighthood, but also to magic and supernatural. This tradition assumes collective form in feasts, rituals and social practices: dances, games, theatre, music and story tellers animated the life of courts and villages. The oral tale is one of the most popular form of entertainment and there are different types of story tellers: the ollahim (professors), the filì (poets), the seanchahite (tale-tellers) and the bardi (singers). This system of performances structures arrange to the fixed scheme theorized by Richard Bauman: “sender, channel, code, receiver”. The adaptability and the flexibility of the oral tale plays in favor of a total participation from the public: pause, gestures, rhythm, vocal imprint are some of the elements that swiftly impress in the memory of the listener. 

Bibliography

Karl Reichl (ed.), Medieval Oral Literature, Berlin/Boston 2012 

bit.ly/PTRN_29